corporate espionage

22 Jan: Hackers Could Secretly Tap Into Corporate Meetings

Hackers Could Secretly Tap Into Corporate Meetings Lots of companies -- and even the White House -- use a conference calling system that could possibly be tapped by hackers, according to new research. On Thursday, cybersecurity experts at SEC Consult revealed a secret doorway that's built into a popular conference calling product built by a company called AMX. AMX makes tablet panels used to control conference calls for businesses, government agencies and universities. The company hard-coded backdoor access into its system. AMX created a "secret account" with a permanent username and password, which means a hacker who already sneaked into a computer network could tap into actual meetings, if the hacker knew the backdoor access code. It's a glaring security hole. Read More Here.  

24 Sep: FBI Warns of Rise in Disgruntled Employees Stealing Data

FBI Warns of Rise in Disgruntled Employees Stealing Data Wall Street Journal (09/23/14) Barrett, Devlin The FBI said Tuesday that it has seen a spike in the number of disgruntled employees who steal company information, sometimes as part of an effort to extort money from previous employers.  There have been cases in which individuals used their access to destroy data, steal software, obtain customer data, make unauthorized purchases, and gain a competitive edge at a new job, the FBI said. A common way to steal information, the FBI noted, is to use cloud storage accounts and personal e-mail. Sometimes, terminated employees still have remote access to the company's system. Organizations that have recently been victimized by data theft have suffered losses of $5,000 to $3 million. The FBI reports that some employees have attempted to extort their employer by restricting access to company...

02 Feb: Confessions of a Corporate Spy

Confessions of a Corporate Spy What do you think it means to be an expert in "hard-to-get elicitation"? It means people tell you things. A competitive intelligence consultant discusses things that can help a business--at the expense of another. When I strolled into a Talbots near closing time on a Wednesday night, I wasn't expecting Phipps Plaza in Atlanta's ritzy Buckhead neighborhood to be so dead. Perfect for me. Less so for the store manager. I entered keenly aware of how completely out of place I must have seemed--a heavyset thirtysomething black guy in Walmart dress slacks, trying to look casual while fondling Hil­lary Clinton-esque blouses. If I were on staff, I might have briefly considered the possibility that I had come in only to knock over the place while things were quiet. And I would have been about right. I'm a competitive-intelligence...